10 Gym Mistakes that are Limiting Your Gains

 

lais

Fitness Star Lais Deleon

10 Bio-mechanical Gym Mistakes that are Limiting Your Gains

Written by Dr. Beau B Hightower
DAAPM, MS, DC, CSCS, CES, FMS-C, MMACS

 

Social media has helped to promote many ideas, but one of the great ones is the online social

presence of fitness. Many commonly agreed upon ideas at the gym are based on sound science,

but many, including form and bio-mechanics are what we call “broscience”. Much of this persists

to this day as trickle-down from the golden age of bodybuilding in the 70s,

before we had advanced imaging, and computers to track maximal muscle contraction.

Here are 10 mistakes that people are making in the gym.

If you can correct these 10 things on the list, you will see the gains

and changes that you are looking for!

Rule 1

1. Squat below parallel (the top of your thigh)

The common adage in the gym is the “ass to grass” mentality. However when we look at what

muscles are active in specific positions, the hamstring and quadriceps groups are eccentrically

loaded during the negative phase of the squat. The quadriceps group has two functions,

hip flexion and knee extension, so when you move the pelvis below 90 degrees, the knee

extension part of your quadriceps is mechanically turned off. This causes the hip flexor Continue reading 10 Biomechanical Gym Mistakes that are Limiting Your Gains

Hey There! You're Still Here.

I can’t believe that it’s been almost 3 years since I walked away from KNUXX.  I literally checked out one day and, while I still thought about it frequently, I didn’t make any effort to mess with anything for quite some time.  My 5 year domain registration came up for renewal this past month and I got an email from my registrar that I needed to renew or risk losing my domain name… hmmm, what should I do?  Well, I started looking at some of the stats and soon realized that I still get over 8,000 visitors a month on this site!  And I haven’t done anything for how long again?!?  I know Dr. Beau and a few others have posted some articles here and there but ultimately nothing much is going on with KNUXX currently.  Should that change?

While the details around why I walked away are probably only important to me and really aren’t that exciting, it still begs the question “Why?”.  Or maybe the better question would be “Why Not?”  As I sit here writing this I’m tempted to get into all the details and provide explanations and justifications for why something that I felt had so much promise suddenly became completely unimportant and almost burdensome.  But I won’t bore you with that – besides, I don’t think anyone even cares – it was always more important to me than it ever was to anyone else.  I digress. Continue reading Hey There! You’re Still Here.

In the Corner with the Ring Doc: The Separated Shoulder, That Bump on Your Shoulder May be Fixable

 

 

 

ac_joint3

Written by Dr. Beau B Hightower
MS, DC, CSCS, CES

Many athletes and weekend warriors have experienced pain in their shoulder after a hard fall. Pain can continue for many years and may begin to impact your day to day activities as well as your athletic performance. There are many causes for shoulder pain, the most common of which include rotator cuff pain, labral tears, fractures of the humeral head, shoulder dislocations, and shoulder separations.

Separated shoulder injuries occur when blunt trauma is applied to the side or top of the shoulder. This can happen with collision sports such as basketball, football, soccer, and mixed martial arts when an athlete runs into another athlete. These injuries also occur during hard falls which are common in cycling, skiing, and even distance running. The separation that is referred to when we discuss separated shoulders is a specific joint along the collar bone that is called the acromio-clavicular joint or more commonly, the AC Joint.

shoulder_impingement_causes01

The AC Joint is the connection between a part of the scapula or shoulder blade and the collar bone. When an impact occurs that is strong enough to damage the ligaments that hold this small joint in place, one end, typically the clavicle or collar bone, separates and is pushed either up or down. This causes immediate pain, and there is nearly always a visible elevation in the affected area of the shoulder.

AC Joint separations are classified into six types with type one, or the least severe being the most common. Types four through six are so severe that surgery is typically required to stabilize the joint and attempt to repair fractures and ligament tears. Type one and two can leave permanent deformity as arthritis and ligament thickening or hypertrophy set in. Type one and two can clinically be improved by shoulder mobilization that can actually improve the visual appearance of the “bump” even years later. By creating motion within this thickened structure, synovial fluid is allowed to re-lubricate the joint which can dramatically improve shoulder pain and appearance. If left untreated, type one and two shoulder dislocations can cause permanent deformity and can contribute to neck pain, shoulder arthritis, and even a painful shoulder restriction condition known as impingement syndrome in which the AC joint can actually damage the rotator cuff that glides underneath it.

If the shoulder trauma is recent, it is important to seek medical evaluation so that they may prescribe diagnostic imaging if needed to rule out fractures or other severe trauma. Treatment of a separated shoulder depends on the severity of the injury. When beginning treatment some of the things one should do first, is control the inflammation, rest the joint, and ice the joint. Take an anti-inflammatory such as ibuprofen or naproxen to help minimize the pain and inflammation. Rest the joint which will also help minimize painful symptoms and allow the healing to begin. When icing, it should be done every four hours for 15 minutes at a time. You may wear a sling until the pain subsides.

 However, if you have a noticeable bump on the end of your collar bone that bothers you, you owe it to yourself to seek a qualified physical medicine specialist to see if this chronic shoulder separation can be improved. If you have pain from an AC Joint separation, you may not have to “shoulder” the load of  unsightly shoulder bumps and pain anymore!

Disclaimer: This article is for educational purposes only. If you have a medical condition, it is prudent that you seek medical evaluation by a properly qualified and licensed practitioner.

hightower-beau 

Dr. Beau Hightower is a former collegiate athlete and avid fight fan. He serves as the President of Elite Ortho-Therapy and Sports Medicine LLC, the premier sports injury resolution center in New Mexico. He serves on the Executive Board of Directors for Parker University and their Alumni Association and treats many elite level UFC fighters in his home practice.

Elite-OSM.com

FightStar 6 On 8th March

On the 8th of March, Africa’s most exciting Amateur MMA tournament comes to the St Johns Hellenic Hall in Primrose ,Germiston.

fight stars

MMA Fighters from all over South Africa as well as from other parts of Africa will converge at this awesome venue to showcase there skills and do battle against each other. All fights are sanctioned by SASCOC and Martial Arts South Africa.

To continue reading, click on page 2…

Pages: 1 2

In the Corner with the Ring Doc: Growing Pains, Keeping Your Young Athlete In The Game

            severs-disease

Written by Dr. Beau B Hightower
MS, DC, CSCS, CES

Remember the 80’s sitcom, Growing Pains? Do you remember the family name on the show? That’s right, if you guessed Seavers, you are correct. If you have ever experienced, or known someone to experience “growing pains” during the teenage years, then you may be familiar with the terms Osgood Schlatter’s and Sever’s. These are painful afflictions that affect the knee and heel of teenagers and young children, particularly in the athletic population. Today we are going to discuss the whys, hows, and ways to prevent these painful disorders from knocking your young athlete out of the game.

Growing pains is a common term used to describe a very specific bone abnormality known as apophysitis. Apophysitis literally means inflammation of the apophysis, which is the technical term of a bony tubercle wear tendons attach to bone. For those of you not familiar with muscle and skeletal anatomy, ligaments connect bone to bone, while tendons connect muscles to bone. In order to move, the muscles must contract which pulls on bones to move our bodies into the position that we desire. Because the force is transmitted through the tendon to the bone, any over-activity can cause tendinitis in adults, or for those whose bones haven’t fully hardened yet, apophysitis. Due to repeated trauma associated with sports, mutiple avulsion fractures occur below the tubercle which results in a painful bump. The most common sites for such an injury are on the heel, below the kneecap, and where the hamstring muscles tie into the pelvis, known as the ischial tuberosity.

These can be extremely painful and cause physical and psychological trauma to a young athlete. Because their growth plates are still open, the athlete’s bones are growing longer, and if they don’t keep the muscles and tendons relaxed and elongated, these muscles will struggle to maintain the accelerated pace of the bone and begin to pull at the attachment points on the bones. One key way to prevent and relieve the symptoms associated with growing pains is by being proactive with self myofascial release. For specific tips on foam rolling, lacrosse ball use, and myofascial stick, please see my previous article on muscular hygiene.

http://knuxx.com/nm/2013/02/in-the-corner-with-the-ring-doc-muscular-hygiene-keeps-fighters-in-the-game/

The most common devices used to apply SMR are foam rollers, lacrosse balls, myofascial sticks, and myofascial “canes”. These tools can prevent and repair  injuries such as anterior and posterior shoulder pain, IT band syndrome,  lower back pain, shin splints, plantar fascitis and more.  Research has shown repeatedly that static stretching is not the definitive answer to musculoskeletal problems, and while there are few papers relating to foam rollers and others, there is plenty of clinical evidence in the athletic community. Stretching tends to put stress at the tendon-bone intersection, and the muscle-tendon intersection, while restrictions within the belly of restricted muscles remain unaffected.

Traditional treatment for apophysitis include rest, ice, compression, and the use of NSAIDS such as Ibuprofen and Naproxen. You should always consult with a medical professional, but by making consistent use of your self-myofascial tools, you can keep your young athlete healthy and in the game. If addressed properly, growing will not require the pains associated with adolescent sports.

Disclaimer: This article is for educational purposes only. If you have a medical condition, it is prudent that you seek medical evaluation by a properly qualified and licensed practitioner.

hightower-beau 

Dr. Beau Hightower is a former collegiate athlete and avid fight fan. He serves as the President of Elite Ortho-Therapy and Sports Medicine LLC, the premier sports injury resolution center in New Mexico. He serves on the Executive Board of Directors for Parker University and their Alumni Association and treats many elite level UFC fighters in his home practice.

Elite-OSM.com

JP 'Tinkerbell' Kruger #1 EFC Africa MW Contender!

IMG-20131210-WA0017

By Jayson du Toit

Next year JP Kruger will challenge Garreth “Soldier Boy” McLellen for the EFC Africa Middle Weight title. While most of us will be taking a December vacation, JP will be hard at work in Thailand at Tiger Muay Thai training camp. Just before he set off we caught up with him to do a quick interview…

To continue reading, click on page 2…

Pages: 1 2

Up Close and Personal with Gorilla Warfare MMA!

IMG-20131203-WA0002

By Jayson du Toit

We recently got the opportunity to speak to Marc Hebert the head trainer and owner of Gorilla Warfare MMA gym to find out what makes this MMA facility so popular and successful…

To continue reading, click on page 2…

Pages: 1 2

IN THE CORNER WITH THE RING DOC: Gamer's Thumb, When an Arthritis Diagnosis Gets a Thumbs Down

owthumb

Written by Dr. Beau B Hightower
MS, DC, CSCS, CES

Our culture continues to move into a digital age which means  more and more use of our hands due to these digital devices which include cell phones, video games, tablets, and more. Due to this reliance on technological devices, particularly with the millenial generation, it is to no surprise that we are seeing a younger and younger patient population with debilitating thumb pain. In the past, most doctors and practitioners would brush thumb pain off as arthritis or simply a part of the aging process, but as we learn more about the pathology of soft tissue injuries, we have come to realize that a simple condition known as De Quervain Tenosynovitis is the main cause for our current epidemic of thumb pain. Symptoms of this particular disease include pain, tenderness, and swelling over the thumb side of the wrist, and difficulty gripping.

Professions such as dental hygienists, office staff, and yes even UFC fighters are at high risk to develop this type of overuse injury.

 While most of the muscles associated with the thumb lie on the palm side, (this is known as the thenar eminance) the most common tendon restrictions lie on the top side of the thumb. Two specific tendons, the abductor pollicus longus and extensor pollicus brevis  are often entrapped either within the tendon sheath (the area that wraps around tendons that protects and allows proper movement) or the retinaculum ( a band of tissue that wraps around the wrist to provide support for tendons, veins, arteries, and nerves) The following image show’s finkelstein’s test, the most accurate orthopedic test to verify gamer’s thumb.

ans7_finkelsteintest

Research shows that 90 percent of patients with gamer’s thumb will recover in one year, but most people simply cannot wait that long for resolution, as the thumb is so vital to our lives, particularly in the digital age.  Most patients can be completely healed within 1-3 treatments by using soft tissue treatment methods  such as Ortho-Therapy or instrument assisted soft tissue mobilization. Due to the frustrating nature of the injury, and the general lack of knowledge of the condition within the medical community, patients are occasionally referred for surgical consults unnecessarily. Operative procedures on the thumb can lead to debilitating bio-mechanical changes down the line. Second line therapies include efficacious treatments such as NSAIDs and Corticosteroid injections of the synovial sheath (doctors often are mistaken and attempt injections into the joint in hopes of alleviating what they perceive to be osteoarthritis)

 If you are experiencing sharp thumb pain, and you believe or have been told that you simply have arthritis, you owe it to yourself to seek out an evidence-based practitioner of physical medicine to evaluate your injury. More than likely, you will be back to texting, typing, and doing the things that you love to do in a very short period of time, simply by getting the right treatment for the right condition. You will be smiling, and will certainly give a “thumb’s up” to the healing hands of your doctor!

 

 

Disclaimer: This article is for educational purposes only. If you have a medical condition, it is prudent that you seek medical evaluation by a properly qualified and licensed practitioner.

hightower-beau 

Dr. Beau Hightower is a former collegiate athlete and avid fight fan. He serves as the President of Elite Ortho-Therapy and Sports Medicine LLC, the premier sports injury resolution center in New Mexico. He serves on the Executive Board of Directors for Parker University and their Alumni Association and treats many elite level UFC fighters in his home practice.

Elite-OSM.com

FightStar 5

by Jayson du Toit

FightStar Amateur Fighting Championship has announced FightStar 5 will be happening on the 16th November!

With massive events in the past that saw huge turn outs and amazing amateur MMA action, FightStar aims to bring yet another epic instalment our way in November.

To continue reading, click on page 2…

Pages: 1 2

Francois Groenewald: Franaconda

frana3

by Jayson du Toit

KNUXX SA: Who is Francois Groenewald?

To continue reading, click on page 2…

Pages: 1 2